Magical and Mysterious Monarchs

“The human race is challenged more than ever before to demonstrate our mastery not over nature but of ourselves.” Rachel Carson

 

Monarch on  tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica

 

According to a news article published in Cottage Life magazine in 2017,  Jennifer Tremeer of the Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory  attributes the  drastic decline in the monarch butterfly population  to the planting of genetically modified crops resistant to herbicides, habitat loss, and severe weather.  This pollinator population, tracked by scientists since 1994, teeters on the verge of extinction.  While some may see the loss of one species as a triviality,  the reality is this species is representative of all pollinator species that may face the same fate.   The US Fish and Wildlife Service reminds us that these diminutive creatures pollinate 75% of the food we consume, including chocolate and coffee! Well, that’s certainly worth one’s attention!

Remember John Muir’s observation, “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”  Individual efforts to help the monarch can be accomplished  through avoiding the use of pesticides, planting milkweed  plants, found at local garden centers; and  by maintaining wild milkweed  varieties in the landscape. Milkweed serves as the host plant for monarch caterpillar larvae as well as a nectar source for adult monarchs.   Learn more about this fall visitor by clicking here.