Priorities and Political Systems

“No piecemeal solution is going to prevent the collapse of whole societies and ecosystems … a radical re-thinking of our values, priorities and political systems is urgent.”
Maude Barlow

Picture of a compost bin
Compost bin,  provided by Keep Mobile Beautiful,  located at Government St. United Methodist Community Garden also known as The Bee Hive

While there are many groups and organizations making laudable efforts to model and advocate for sound environmental practices supporting Earth’s sustainability,  government agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Interior,  are being undermined  by economic greed and  hubris. These agencies, managed by officials placed by the current administration,  are charged with reversing laws and regulations protecting the environment as well as public health.   Degradation of the environment, destruction of America’s natural wonders, and threats to public health  can be halted if citizens speak out against these atrocities.  Citizens should voice their concerns to  local and state elected officials including those serving in the House of Representatives and the Senate.  Links for those currently serving at the national level are listed below.

US Senate 

US House of Representatives by Zipcode

Upon identification of  the representative,  execute a search for his/her email address.  The  Alabama First District  representative is Bradley Byrne. Click here for his email address.

Please read a recent article by NPR (National Public Radio) highlighting one activity by EPA officials that should be of concern to everyone breathing air and consuming seafood.  “… Mercury Limits On Coal Plants Too Costly, Not ‘Necessary’

The time to act is now!

A View From The Top

“We have to shift our emphasis from economic efficiency and materialism towards a sustainable quality of life and to healing of our society, of our people and our ecological systems. ” ~Janet Holmes à Court

 

Mornings At Cheaha

 

All of this natural splendor  will disappear if we continue in our failure to live lightly upon the Earth.   Our grandchildren should be able to share with their grandchildren the magnificence of this planet.  Teach by example to your offspring the value of: Refuse, Reuse, and Recycle.

Start by refusing single use plastics.

  • Bring your own shopping bags.
  •  Do you really need a straw?????
  • Invest in a reusable water bottle.
  • You know all those sugary soft drinks aren’t good for you anyway!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Camera Ready

“The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of  those who have not viewed the world.”
― Alexander von Humboldt, Works of Alexander von Humboldt

This petite hummer looks like a chubby little fellow. But looks are deceiving-it weighs less than two pennies! It has fluffed its feathers to capture air to maintain warmth during cold weather.

Most hummingbirds visit feeders during the warmer months,  but a few hardy souls visit during the winter months. Many of these late comers are not commonly seen in the local area. While this encourages hummer fans to keep their feeders out, fans must remember to keep the feeders clean and filled with fresh sugar water.

The feeder pictured is dishwasher safe, and holds about a cup of liquid.  The  guiding factor in choosing a feeder is how easy it is to clean.  Learn everything necessary about feeding hummingbirds at hummingbirds.net.

Camera bugs should hang feeders  in locations for  perfect shots as well as  avoiding disturbance of the subjects. The pictured feeder hangs on an east facing porch. Hummers are known to return to the same feeder every year at the same time of the year.

Click here to learn more about hummer visitors in Alabama.

 

Everyone’s Responsibility

“Environment is no one’s property to destroy; it’s everyone’s responsibility to protect.” Mohith Agadi

Clinging to a snag in a saltmarsh in coastal Mobile County, an egret surveys his kingdom. (Look for  tiny white dot in the middle of the picture.)

Daily choices have consequences for the environment. For example, runoff from lawns and gardens can carry toxic chemicals that harm wildlife in the above saltmarsh.  Herbicides and pesticides should be used judiciously, if at all. Look for environmentally friendly choices and read all labels carefully.

One may say, “I don’t live near a saltmarsh, so what does that have to do with me?”Everyone lives in  an area of land called a watershed, meaning that all water that flows across or under that area  travels to the lowest body of water.  For a large part of Alabama that body of water would be Mobile Bay.  So one doesn’t have to live near Mobile Bay to affect it.

Too many of Alabama’s citizens are not aware of something called non-point source pollution.  NPS is water and air pollution that comes from many sources (diffuse or dispersed)  such as runoff. A more easily identified source of pollution is called single source, such as a pipe from a factory. A picture is worth a thousand words, so take a look at this article to help identify common non-point sources .

An example of a watershed can be found at this link. It’s not an Alabama watershed, but you’ll get the idea. The next time you’re  out and about, look for those signs that identify the creek or stream to where the water flows in an area. These signs are little reminders that all water travels to larger and larger bodies of water and eventually into saltmarshes, bays, gulfs, and oceans-even the water in storm drains goes there too.  So you see, we all have a responsibility to protect the environment, because we all affect the environment.

Challenge for the New Year

“Our challenge for the future is that we realize we are very much a part of the earth’s ecosystem, and we must learn to respect and live according to the basic biological laws of nature.”  Jim Fowler

 

                                                                                Great blue heron hunting in salt marsh in South Mobile County

The great blue heron certainly understands the need to preserve wetlands. In a wetland, this marshland king finds  food, water, shelter, and space in a suitable arrangement. In other words, a wetland is a habitat or home for this heron and countless other living things.

Wetlands are the third most productive ecosystem in the world, surpassed only by tropical rainforests and coral reefs.  While everyone should be appreciative of wetland benefits, coastal residents should be especially appreciative due to its sponge-like characteristic which  contributes to the reduction of flood damage.  Refer to the NOAA website to gain a greater perspective of the benefits of coastal wetlands,  the need for preservation, and how individuals can help. This  a must read for coastal residents!

Well, what is this ecosystem thing? Are there many ecosystems or just one as Jim Fowler’s quote may suggest?  Check out this easy-to-understand explanation at ESchoolToday.  

It is time for a field trip! Visit  a wetland, observe  this wondrous ecosystem, and communicate to legislators Jim Fowler’s advice, “we must learn to respect and live according to the basic biological laws of nature.”  There are far too many powerful agents, acting through hubris and financial greed, arguing otherwise. The future belongs to you, your children, and your grandchildren. Help make it bright and healthy. Would anyone want something less?

 

Magical and Mysterious Monarchs

“The human race is challenged more than ever before to demonstrate our mastery not over nature but of ourselves.” Rachel Carson

 

Monarch on  tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica

 

According to a news article published in Cottage Life magazine in 2017,  Jennifer Tremeer of the Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory  attributes the  drastic decline in the monarch butterfly population  to the planting of genetically modified crops resistant to herbicides, habitat loss, and severe weather.  This pollinator population, tracked by scientists since 1994, teeters on the verge of extinction.  While some may see the loss of one species as a triviality,  the reality is this species is representative of all pollinator species that may face the same fate.   The US Fish and Wildlife Service reminds us that these diminutive creatures pollinate 75% of the food we consume, including chocolate and coffee! Well, that’s certainly worth one’s attention!

Remember John Muir’s observation, “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”  Individual efforts to help the monarch can be accomplished  through avoiding the use of pesticides, planting milkweed  plants, found at local garden centers; and  by maintaining wild milkweed  varieties in the landscape. Milkweed serves as the host plant for monarch caterpillar larvae as well as a nectar source for adult monarchs.   Learn more about this fall visitor by clicking here.